Inside Out (2015)

The-inside-out-poster

Thoughtful and brimming with creativity, this is Pixar well and truly back on the scene after a few scratchy patches. The construction, emotion and wonder of what keeps our minds ticking leads the film into some smart colourful set ups with that expected Pixar stamp of heart you can’t dislike.

Minnesota born Riley (Kaitlyn Dias) is going through the upheaval of moving to San Francisco with her mum and dad, little knowing that inside her head are the emotions keeping her brain chugging along and aiding her actions. Joy (Amy Poehler), Disgust (Mindy Kaling), Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith) are at the controls until two of the team end up lost in the back-lot of Riley’s mind and need to get back to stop the 11 year old from going awry.

There is so much joy to be had within this film, the colour coded characters for a start lift the film with that bright feeling of bold warmth, reds, blues and yellows shine on the screen gifting us that summer buzz. That could just be me but Pixar have a knack for lighting up cinemas with their tales of objects, be it toys or emotions, delighting audiences and putting some sort of magical glow in my heart. It’s the clever storytelling that keeps them ahead in the game and this is no exception.

Pete Docter directs but also conjured up the story and screenplay along with help from Ronnie del Carmen, Josh Cooley and Meg LeFauve. The process of what goes on inside our skulls could be dark but they give it such unyielding spirit. Of course the plot travels down the sadness route to provide dramatic weight and this is something they always build up well. The straining family backdrop accompanied by the struggle of keeping Riley as they want is tense and believable, considering that the film is about walking talking emotions in our heads.

Also, there’s such fantastic rewards to be had in the journey that we go on with two of the emotions. Discovering what the subconscious, long term memory and other thought processes look like is a visual treat. The story makes room for clever openings on how we work as people and what could be behind our eyes helping us make decisions. Concepts of imaginary friends and forgotten memories all truly make you think when Pixar are at the wheel.

Michael Giacchino composes and you can feel that same emotive sense in the music that he crafted for ‘Up’. It bounces along when necessary making you happy and when the troubles begin bubbling away the music becomes tense, not too dark for the kids but worrying enough that you feel the desired emotions. I’m worried about how many times I’m writing the word emotions in this film review. But seriously, it stirs up the right…feels.

Animation wise, the content is gorgeous, the flaking static design of the main emotions and how each one suits their host body is perfect. The memory balls are shining, the view of Riley’s islands is intelligent and detailed and once the journey begins seeing the wonderful ways the brain could be if we were so lucky is fascinating. A dream scene and the little moment of abstraction and turning into broken pieces and 2D art is a cool sequence to watch. It’s a provoking and warm welcome back to this studio and their work.

All the voices suit greatly, Amy Poehler brings a peppy kick to Joy and though she’s control obsessed you can’t help but like her for the sunny disposition she has on the story. The golden voice has to be with Phyllis Smith who somehow makes you laugh and empathise with someone so one tone in their speech. Simply put, it’s a fantastically delivered role. Bill Hader freaks out in a non annoying way as Fear, Mindy Kaling manages to make you smirk as the person inside all of us wanting to spit the truth and Lewis Black blows his top being Anger, the rough determination speaking to all of us who want to get mad. As I mentioned the voices suit greatly, making the characters stand out as individual and integral.

It’s something that is more than worth one watch just to break up the unoriginal trash that floods cinemas consistently. It’s so damn inventive, fun and emotional that inside and out this movie does everything it needs to entice and excite people of every age. No disgust or anger, just sheer joy.

8.5/10

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