Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation (2015)

Mission-Impossible-Rogue-Nation-IMAX-Poster

When you go in to see a Mission: Impossible film you can always guarantee action, fun and a well constructed story, try and forgot the second one, and this outing is no exception, really taking action packed to the limits we see badass Cruise globe-hopping in a darker tale as a twisted version of the spy force become the ones to find.

Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) is under investigation with the rest of IMF – Impossible Mission Force, he uses his time to focus on his theory that an operative titled The Syndicate is to blame for a series of accidents. Pulling back together tech whizz Benji (Simon Pegg) Hunt tries to track down the leader of this evil group to prove IMF is a worthy organisation. Though mysterious newbie Ilsa Faust (Rebecca Ferguson) may prove to be a help and hindrance as all actions shoot towards the finale.

Just to put it out there, I do love Mission: Impossible movies, there’s something so entertaining about them that even if the plot sometimes weakens I don’t really notice or care. Yet this fifth installment has an interesting arc, with a darker take on an IMF set up being one step ahead of Ethan’s usual one step ahead routine. The story is engaging and it pulls together more than a couple of impossible mission scenarios while still balancing that undercurrent of finding a shadow organisation. At times you can tell where things may go, as in it being a tale of them being shut down and scrutinised, this ‘in hiding’ situation comes with certain expectations but it’s done well.

Now to the action, where Cruise clearly has no insurance policy or one so high that I fear for the people behind the camera yanking at the collar as he runs about the place like a mini rocket. When a film begins with a sequence so barmy and yet brilliant as Tom Cruise jumping onto a moving plane and then hanging on as it takes off, you know you’re in for a ride and a half. That moment is no less cool even if you’ve seen the trailers and adverts multiple times. Then car and motorbike chases, fist fights and an underwater task pile in to add more fun to the mix as the movie progresses its 130 minute run time.

Christopher McQuarrie follows up Brad Bird’s glorious Ghost Protocol with a film that packs a lot in but it looks good too. It appears like it should, establishing shots of worldwide locations, fast crazed close ups for the fighting and slow builds for the Impossible moments, like Benji taking the nervous trip through a Moroccan power station. It might not be stylish or have some kind of poetic handle but McQuarrie gifts the film that necessary summer blockbuster vibe and focuses on presenting these action scenes in an exhilarating way.

Highlight of the film for me, in terms of directing, music and action is the Austrian Opera scene which is a fantastically grand series of events that looks breathtaking even if it’s taking in the backstage of an opera. The theatrical way it keeps on building, rigging keeps on moving and characters add to Hunt’s confusion of who to trust which we join, is masterful. It’s a beautiful sequence aided by a fantastic score and stands out as intriguing, classy and gripping.

The music scored by Joe Kraemer is orchestral and swelling to do its best in raising the hairs on the back of your neck. He utilises the theme by Lalo Schifrin, adding country flavour to the famous sounds, in London it becomes classic and regal and it Morocco it comes across exotic. The score in between is just as neat in adding to the visuals and building that sense of urgency in the battles Ethan must face. Cleverly as well, from the beginning using a record shop to discuss classical music, the film takes it further by blending sections of ‘Nessun Dorma’ underneath scenes which comes to fruition in that opera sequence in Vienna.

Tom Cruise is the man when it comes to doing stunts. He’s always reliable for action and this film makes that statement no less true. Gladly you’re not watching a double or CGI, you know that the man up there on screen is none other than Cruise. His determination is what makes him likable and he pretty much is Ethan Hunt. Rebecca Ferguson is an enigmatic arrival in the franchise, balancing that shadowy ambiguity really well. Step aside critics as well as she’s a kick ass female character that can hold her own, provides a challenge for the male lead and isn’t there for a romantic entanglement. Simon Pegg, once more comes back for that ingredient of light relief though his role is amped up more as he’s put on the field in a bigger way and could face the consequences. Jeremy Renner is slightly sidelined to a suit and politics role as he hangs back traversing Hunley’s orders. Alec Baldwin who I can no longer see as anyone but Jack Donaghy is there as the role Baldwin can do in his sleep but therefore it sells. Ving Rhames exudes cool in a glare though he too is on the outskirts with Renner as it becomes the Ethan & Benji show. Then there’s Sean Harris as the most chilling villain yet, his costuming adding to the slender figure of Harris’ precise acting, creepily calm voice and cold stare.

It isn’t the best in the series but it ticks all the boxes required for a fun and entertaining watch with enough action to please the senses. It’s a cool summer blast of mystery, thrills and spills to make way for more I’m sure.

7.5/10

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