Finding Dory (2016)

Finding Dory - 2016 - tt2277860 - Poster

Thirteen years after the watery world of ‘Finding Nemo’, we’re back under the sea with the recognisable clown-fish and blue tang. This time around the story shifts into following forgetful Dory and though there are distractions of new characters, stunning animation and some fun moments, this doesn’t make you forget that you’re watching something familiar and predictable.

Dory (Ellen DeGeneres) is still with father and son pair Marlin and Nemo (Albert Brooks & Hayden Rolence) but she feels she’s forgetting something important. Flashbacks and tid-bits of her past and parents come and go and she ends up in a Marine Life Institute hoping to finally remember something and find her family.

Now, I must say I wasn’t a huge fan of the 2003 aquatic adventure but I admit it was and still is colourful and quite poignant in places. This sequel, directed again by Andrew Stanton has the same watery wonder but feels very samey and for a Pixar movie, that’s a trend I’m starting to worry about now…what with the less than inspiring ‘The Good Dinosaur’.

Animation speaking, this is one of the finest movies out there. I say this because the detail in every shot that must have been ached over in story boarding meetings come to fantastic life. I can imagine water is hard to get right but they pull it off mightily. This feature and the sweet Piper short beforehand excel in texture and shading. The grains of sand, waves of water, foam, sea-life and plants all look beautifully real.

What I found a little bum aching about this film is that it begins stretching out and even the children of the audience were restless before the third act had kicked in. Maybe it’s because it’s following the most annoying character from the first flick or perhaps it’s that thing after thing keeps happening stopping Dory getting to her goal, which as you’d expect her to get to it anyway it all begins dawning to a yawn fest as she’s tested time and time again.

The memory loss idea is fine to a point and endearingly cute when handled by the bug eyed baby Dory, but then it just keeps going, just keeps going, going, going. Hey, even silly is okay in my books, more so for animations but there’s points in this film that ideas become a tad too over the top and the whole Marine location doesn’t feel as special as it could be. It’s generally the knack of repeatedly telling us about memory, life and being good even if you’re missing of something, i.e memory that don’t need to be so often and so obvious.

I did like the weird yet well written use of Sigourney Weaver as some unseen goddess aiding the forgetful fish. The animation as mentioned is superb, the new characters are fun, from a cool camouflaging octopus to a struggling beluga whale. The moments of darkness are done well and make you near emotional as the film questions Dory’s existence but I can’t help thinking that I’ll forget this pretty soon and remember that Piper was much better than the actual full length Pixar creation.

Ellen DeGeneres is much loved in America and here she must have her fans, so I can imagine they’re loving her non stop forgetful routine and energetic enthusiasm she voices, which I like to a point but there’s a line and it gets grating quite quickly. Albert Brooks is a great worrier as Marlin and it’s nice to hear him back as the parental clown-fish. Ed O’Neill is Hank the octopus and voices cranky very well but makes him a character to still like. Fellow Modern Family actor Ty Burrell is Bailey the beluga whale with echo location problems and though he’s underused he gets some funny nervous lines and excitement nearing the end. It’s nice to see that former Nemo voice artist Alexander Gould gets a role in this movie too.

Spectacularly animated and a decent sequel, but more of something that feels like an unoriginal continuation and nothing different.

6/10

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