Cargo (2018)

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In the dusty outback of Australia, ‘Sherlock’ star Martin Freeman tries desperately to survive, in what could only be described as bleak conditions. Adapted from a short film idea by the same creators, ‘Cargo’ does feel like it a little weighed down by a full length run-time but it doesn’t stop it being a gritty portrayal of fighting against the odds.

A virus has swept over the world and anyone infected has just 48 hours of human life left, before they turn into flesh seeking zombies. Andy (Martin Freeman) treks the countryside Down Under carrying his baby girl Rosie, trying to find a hospital to combat the effects he carries with him.

What stands out strongest within this post apocalyptic plot, is the character studying. Yolande Ramke writes a powerfully subtle zombie flick by focusing on the behaviours of its characters, also directing with Ben Howling they ensure the movie doesn’t fill us with easy-to-do blood splattered gore or adrenaline pumped tension. They work nicely together in really making you feel for Andy and understand not just him but the people he interacts with from start to finish. Good zombie films are always showing us the true monsters are found in us when people do the nastiest things to stay alive and this feature is no exception.

I must admit that there are times when a little shot more of tension would have been welcome. The 1 hour 40ish length does have a few points where it feels stretched out and having a couple of scenes whittled down would have kept the dramatic punch alive; as if mirroring the narrow time frame Andy has to survive. Also, aside from the clever and well written/acted character work, this isn’t exactly a film that demolishes the genre, if you’ve seen one or two then you’ve seen this one as well.

Aboriginal life gets a spotlight and there’s a good moment when a trapped Aborigine comments on the sickness but relays it back to how their people, their way of living is all but destroyed by white people, Australia has indeed left this tribe of rich culture to struggle in the background. It’s important that this film highlights them and moments including an Aborigine girl are soft, mystical ones that give the film an original spark.

‘Cargo’ may be a film that would be more tense as a thirty minute outing but there’s no denying that Freeman, newcomer Simone Landers and the writing/directing masters have provided Netflix and us a bold social commentary laced with the gnash of zombie thrills.

7/10

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Isle of Dogs (2018)

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4 years after the sublime, (and one of my favourite movies) ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’, director Wes Anderson returns with a wonderfully told stop-motion tale, centred around one boy and many dogs.

In a dystopian Japan, where all pooches have been exiled to an island away from Megasaki City, because of an outbreak of dog flu, is where we follow runaway boy and makeshift pilot Atari (Koyu Rankin). He crash lands on the Isle of Dogs, hoping to find his lost dog Spots (Liev Schreiber) and is helped by a pack of five, though one named Chief (Bryan Cranston) really doesn’t want to aid the quest.

Coming back to the amazing world of stop-motion, after his 2009 foray with ‘Fantastic Mr. Fox’ is the man who hands such detail and a clear stamp of identity to his work. Wes Anderson utilises the craftsmanship of this art form to great effect, in a way that never distracts from the wit and gorgeousness of the storytelling. Split up into numbered parts, this movie owes a lot to rich Japanese culture and director of ‘Seven Samurai’. The dystopian world and the adventure story of finding a dog is well realised and easy to follow for all.

There is so much incredible detail, even in the backgrounds, where so many must have tirelessly put great time and effort in ensuring all parts of the frame are filled with loving attention. Trash Island is literally littered with stunning scenery of coloured bottles, rubbish, an abandoned athletics centre and amusement park all gift the visuals, a grimy yet playful stroke. The dogs themselves shuffle along and move with the lovely manoeuvring as we see the stop-motion in effect. This feature film is further proof of my love for stop-motion as a beautiful means of telling stories, deserving of acclaim creating these textual landscapes and characters.

It can’t be a film solely judged on the means of how the visuals are presented though, story is of course a massive factor and though it’s fun, interesting in many points and screams Anderson, it isn’t an out and out success for me. There isn’t the same charm resonating in this, that can be found in ‘Moonrise Kingdom’ or ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’. The grounded, dirty look thanks to the Island is somewhat cold and therefore leaves the story feeling vaguely dark and cold, I’d expect it to be uninviting for young children hoping to watch something parading cutesy dogs but I’d be lying if I said this film wasn’t mostly delightful to watch.

I wouldn’t be as harsh to say it was boring, but I did become disinterested in the middle of the narrative, Part 3 – The Rendezvous felt like a weak point and was a blip in the movie where I slightly switched off; thinking the plot was dragging but aside from that, this is a fully realised, smart and witty story thanks to the quirky genius of Anderson and fellow story gurus; Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman and Kunichi Nomura.

Cranston is ruff, sorry roughly irritable and brilliant as the naysayer and distant mangy mutt, hoping to eat scraps and have nothing to do with the little boy pilot. Jeff Goldblum wonderfully spiels off rumours his dog persona of Duke has heard. Scarlett Johansson uses her distinctive voice to suitably play enigmatic and mysterious show-dog Nutmeg. Edward Norton, in fact gets a lot more say than the Chief of the pack and in his usual Norton way, delivers an Anderson script with perfect execution. Courtney B. Vance is a solid casting choice with a soothing narration that guides us in places.

This comedy stop-motion animation is no bad dog and sits close to being a perfect pup. I wasn’t fully engrossed constantly but my interest peaked enough to label this worthy pedigree chum; a movie with a talented cast and enjoyable quirkiness.

7.5/10

Black Panther (2018)

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We’re into the second half of MCU’s Phase Three and what a way to enter it. The King of Wakanda doesn’t just step onto the big screen but pounces. This is a film rife with character and importantly; culture.

After ‘Civil War’ saw the death of T’Chaka, his son returns to his hugely advanced home of Wakanda, where he takes the path to become the new king and rightful Black Panther. T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) has the support of most around him but returning baddie Klaue (Andy Serkis) and some stolen vibranium doesn’t help. Moreover his crimes introduce T’Challa to Erik Stevens (Michael B. Jordan), a soldier hell-bent on taking over Wakanda.

Marvel and its cinematic world have done spectacularly well thus far in creating hype and fun escapism, but admittedly they quite often miss the mark with their characters and villains, gladly both work very well in this movie. The community of Wakandans feel real and a lot of the forefront officials are fleshed out with enough dialogue and/or screen-time to ensure that it isn’t solely the titular hero that nabs the focus. In regards to the villain; this film gives us two big ones, the first is the resurgence of OTT but deliciously snarly Klaue, the second is Stevens who works brilliantly because, as an audience member you can feel for him and buy into his cause, at least when he’s not taking these notions too far.

Ryan Coogler; in what is just his third film, directs a powerful film that feels right within the comic book world but also throws in such interesting dynamics of globe shattering consequences, self beliefs and the bigger picture of black people and personal struggles which of course is undeniably vital within this day and age and state of the world. There’s a gleeful fun within tie-ins and action sequences but better than this, director Coogler with Joe Robert Cole, as a fellow writer manage to gift this feature a drive and political motivated subtext.

Seeing it on the glorious IMAX screen of course makes the entire film a thing of beauty and massive spectacle but I just know that it would still have the same impact however it is seen. There is an unmistakable rich quality to the production value; the colours, fabrics and fashions, the settings, the music all come together and culminate with a force of life and soul. It’s a film that had my skin buzzing with excitement and the eye is taken by almost every scene and frame.

There’s a slight DC and yes, Marvel weakness of the CGI overload these films can so often swerve towards, which is what worries me about the sprawl of generated figures and Thanos in the ‘Infinity War’ trailer. No more can this be seen in a battle on some grassy fields and some CG rhinos that appear, which slightly lost me from the film, but that’s pretty much the only negative I had.

Boseman is an amazing hero and plays the demanding role of king and leader with gravitas. There’s great emotion behind his eyes that shows he can also see the problems with his place and people, which makes a superhero, human. Lupita Nyong’o plays the ex of T’Challa but she isn’t as one dimensional as that. The actor packs a punch and effortless spy magnitude to her role. Letitia Wright is Shuri; Black Panther’s sister. She scatters the movie with great humour and tech know-how that makes her like a more capable Q persona. Jordan almost rivals Boseman and Wright by stealing the majority of the show with a charismatic and deeply engaging turn as the hopeful throne taker. He too ensures to not just be panto villainy and adds remarkable layers to his character. I would be writing for a long time more if I commented on all the other terrific actors in this film, who all unite with a crackling sense of energy and seriousness that helps make this more than just a comic book movie.

Long live the King…and Coogler, let us hope he returns because he has masterfully given the MCU a breath of fresh air and stunning culture.

8.5/10

 

Moana (2016)

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It’s the 53rd animated release from those Disney titans and this time we get a great new world and culture, a head-strong non princess type princess and that same old pleasurable House of Mouse fun for all the family.

On the island of Motunui, lives Moana (Auli’i Cravalho) who is the chief’s daughter. She dreams of what lies beyond the reef and wishes to explore the ocean. She finally gets her chance when a blight hits her home and a tale of ancestors and thievery drives her to find Maui (Dwayne Johnson), a demi-god and have him deliver a powerful stone back to its rightful place.

What is most enjoyable about this feature is the dimensions of character and the interesting Polynesian backdrop. The beautiful world we get to inhabit for an hour and 40 minutes is new and feels rich. It certainly helps that the creators make Moana a character with lots to do, say and she isn’t at all two-dimensional. The island villagers and the culture looks impressive and it’s this different setting and tone that gladly takes us away from the usual Disney saccharin vibes.

The music again is stepped up, like the Mickey Mouse maestros know to keep one step ahead when conjuring up the sound of their movies. Here they employ the help of Hamilton acclaimed Lin-Manuel Miranda who writes the songs with Opetaia Foa’i. There’s such a delicious texture to the songs, echoing with a sound that feels perfect for the setting. An Innocent Warrior raises hairs and sounds amazing in the cinema over the scenery. Where You Are is a jovial and tropical start to the introduction of the sunny island. How Far I’ll Go is the clear front-runner for Academy attention and is gorgeous to listen to. The less said about Shiny the better.

Ron Clements and John Musker are together again and this is their first CGI Disney film. They direct a stunning film about myth, mischief and might. They utilise a brilliant team of animators who have created a lush world to truly marvel at, not only is there the 3D styling, we get a fabric felt looking portion of animation during a song and the tattoo 2D moments featured on the torso of Maui.

I only have one big problem with the film and that is the story structure. The opening is exciting and the latter part is engaging, slightly dark and filled with eventual obvious hope and happiness. Annoyingly a large section of the middle is slow and drifts like Moana’s canoe into the land of boredom. As we settle in with Moana and Maui it’s like the plot sags into an attempt at a road-trip discovery without any of the perky coming of age drama. Also the chicken is not only the dumbest character in Disney history but the most pointless, the pig is severely underused and that makes me sad.

Overlooking the typical fairly tedious journey of ‘finding yourself’ that Disney love, this is a refreshing animated turn with a great soundtrack, a confident and interesting female protagonist and some stunning scenes that will delight many of varying ages.

7/10