Passengers (2016)

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‘There’s a reason they woke up early’, so the tagline for this movie goes, as it turns out it’s not a very interesting or even great one. The only great thing the film has going for it is the fun chemistry between its leads and a superbly glossy style for the ship where the action takes place.

Avalon; a spaceship, is travelling to Homestead II, a planet for people to live on. The course will take 90 years but suddenly passenger Jim Preston (Chris Pratt) awakes from his hibernation pod and finds himself alone. Preston’s only company is a barman android named Arthur (Michael Sheen). Later down the line, writer Aurora Lane (Jennifer Lawrence) is awoken and with Jim they try to solve the ship’s mystery whilst also falling for each other.

For the positives of this movie, the spaceship has a cool and incredibly sleek design. It’s clear the makers of the film have taken time to think about how certain rooms and items should appear. Avalon is a rotating craft and on the inside, modern technology is advanced with rooms aboard boasting entertainment to rival cruise liners. The connection between Jim and Aurora grows nicely and is believable consistently as they spend more time together. Gravity falls, machines fail and threat does come into play for moments which is good to see but that doesn’t outweigh the rubbish plot.

It’s a shame the story increases in it’s ridiculousness because for the portions of the movie where Pratt is by himself the movie is strong. It of course never reaches that amazing solitary ‘Moon’ vibe of Rockwell/Jones but it gets close and has a neat cold vibe about it as we see him struggle. Sadly as the sci-fi dwindles and the romance takes over it feels like ‘Titanic’ in space, also plot points that create dramatic changes are executed in the most expositional way.

Not only these moments annoyed me in how the writers got the story to move forwards but there were no twists which I expected and the actual thing that caused early rising from hibernation was nowhere near a revelation as it could…should have been. That could have been a clever and possibly dark idea played with but they never tread down that path, even ‘Wall-E’ is a darker comment on society than this is.

Chris Pratt is engaging and manages to submerge his usual Pratt shtick as the cabin-fever sets in. Jennifer Lawrence is a glowing presence as she steps into the story and breaks down with suitable emotion upon realising why she’s there. Together as a couple of love struck space travellers they work well and a spark is clear. Michael Sheen plays a near emotionless character to convincing standards with ever present glossy eyes and almost creepy smile adding to his role.

This film gets more dumb as it continues and makes you forget the nice intense moments that it started with. Aside from a captivating pairing of actors this is a creepily played out love story that doesn’t know how to stop.

5.5/10

 

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The Light Between Oceans (2016)

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There’s no denying that this romantically toned period drama looks effortlessly beautiful. The location greatly encapsulates both the sheer wonder of an island but the brute reality it provides also. Aside from the look and performances in this film, I found portions of the story wavering and slow.

WW1 soldier Tom Sherbourne (Michael Fassbender) gets himself a temporary position as a lighthouse keeper and soon gets the permanent role. Away from Janus island he falls for Isabel (Alicia Vikander) who shares this feeling of affection and togetherness. Staying together on Janus as husband and wife they think life is bliss but soon it fractures and a boat washes up offering them a risky opportunity at happiness.

Now knowing that this movie was directed by Derek Cianfrance, who was at the wheel of ‘The Place Beyond the Pines’, it’s clear to see the parallels in style. Both films look and flow very well but seem to lose interest by the last third, this 2016 release may not lose interest as possibilities of crime heat up but the way it’s directed doesn’t build up any gripping connection which is a shame, because the way we fall into the romance of Tom and Isabel before this is done so well.

Cianfrance also wrote the screenplay and again, it’s the last third where everything becomes so tinged with niceties that it almost threatens to bore you. More often than not, this film goes along trying to make you cry or at least engage in a sad manner to what we’re seeing, sometimes it works thanks to the performances but the majority of it starts souring because it feels like it’s shooting for the Academy’s attention.

Michael Fassbender delicately places the almost silent and war-torn Tom, clearly racked with past sins and now performing nicely, this new guilt and sense of right and wrong. Alicia Vikander powers through with gusto and raw emotion when it’s called for but has a chance for a softer smiley side near the beginning. The two of them together and enthralling and their real life connection obviously shines through. Rachel Weisz is great in this too, arriving late but making her mark as Hannah, a woman ridden with grief and loss.

The emotion it strives for isn’t as wrenching as it should be and it all feels like a tame melodrama by the end but a trio of fantastic acting, Desplat’s score and the cinematography help retain it’s cinematic romance.

6/10

Z for Zachariah (2015)

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Nicely brimming with anxiety, this science fiction apocalyptic-like drama is further helped by the performances and an interesting magnifying glass placed over strained bonds.

Farmer and apparent last human Ann Burden (Margot Robbie) has got used to her routine until one day she sees another person walking along in a radiation suit. After helping him out of a life endangering bathe, John Loomis (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is invited back to the farm where they live together and a possible relationship grows until Caleb (Chris Pine) turns up and puts a tense spin on the dynamics.

What I liked about this film quite a lot is the grounded feel, it certainly inhabits a small scale of a bigger more devastated world and within this there’s a great focused intensity on character that is ripe for theatre set drama. To be honest, a lot of the story involved feels and sounds like something that would work extremely well on stage, just the 3 actors for a start gives it that impression.

Craig Zobel directs rather well, he makes sure that the story keeps ticking but all the while there’s burning moments of danger, these anxious steps speak volumes about the rivalry between the two men and the possible consequences that could arise. The parallel between Loomis on a teetering rock and Burden slowly shoving a glass of her table is a great moment of no dialogue but a lot is said, making you wonder what happens to Loomis during that point, this perfect touch of mystery also occurs in a better way surrounding Caleb.

The relationships between the 3 people are written strongly, each of the men are worrying figures that come into the innocent, religious life of Ann, and though Loomis may be kind at first he is not without flaws and his jealousy runs rife leading to the dramas that follow. It this trio of deconstructing human behaviour that becomes compelling, at least for me it did.

Margot Robbie provides a beautiful performance, lost by the welcoming of these new figures but still trying to be strong for her father, her faith and herself. She looks surprisingly plain which is something for Robbie and you feel sorry for her. Ejiofor can dominate the screen nicely and brings a brooding sense of unease during his jealous spells. Likewise Chris Pine, in his more Hollywood poster boy appearance, he plays arrogant well in thinking he can swoop in on Ann.

If you have patience and can appreciate slow burning character dramas, then this is a film I’d recommend. It has a fantastic cast, a quite alarming end and a great look on a world with and without hope.

6.5/10

No Stranger Than Love (2015)

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Wow, after seeing the copious amounts of negative reviews for this apparently “disappointingly bland” romantic comedy movie, I expected something tiresome and bad. Instead I got something that however lacking of succeeding it’s aim, was still watchable and interesting.

Art teacher Lucy Sherrington (Alison Brie) is super sweet and nice, all the men in the town love her even if they don’t know her that well. Lucy shares a secret with gym teacher Clint Coburn (Colin Hanks). Together they declare strong feelings for one another which leads to a deep repercussion.

Without going into the aftermath of what saying “I love you” has in store for them both, I can say because I didn’t glance at the plot summary I’m glad I wasn’t in the know. Likewise I shall not say here what happens in case people reading haven’t seen the bio for what this movie is about, that way it won’t spoil what I thought was a unique and clever surprise.

Nick Wernham directs this sickly rom-com with a few neat shots and the capturing of this small town is done well. It feels like a place we all know from movies where everyone knows other people’s business or would like to. Having the character of Lucy not just a plain easy nice gal makes her more engaging, even if she isn’t stretched further in terms of characteristics. Wernham manages to land this film a quirky tone in the most part which does help.

Even if I don’t fully agree with the bad reviews, I must say that the film didn’t go anywhere once the thing that happens…happened. A shady character becomes boring as he goes on and the oddness of the town feels ever fainter as the plot progresses. It does then sadly become a usual suspect of the rom-com genre with cliches, lovey dovey writing and a wishy washy ending. Though I did like the admittedly pretentious poem recited on the hill before the credits hit.

Maybe it’s just my sort of thing, a weird premise and a kooky look at love but I quite enjoyed this movie and didn’t find it that terrible. It doesn’t work when trying to script the whole frailty of life, the workings of the human heart and love but it’s a cute indie film that delivered a cool surprise, a few laughs and a shot at affirming subtext. Also having Alison Brie in it probably helped too.

Speaking of which, Brie is captivating but doesn’t have much material to cope with aside from the Annie ‘Community’ appeal of being kind and objected. She plays the romantic interest to everybody well and you do feel for her as she tries coping with the fact she’s done something wrong. Colin Hanks utilises his voice well, in a way that makes him increasingly annoying which is just right for the development of this story. Justin Chatwin is an interesting man as Rydell. He’s clearly motivated and leering but there’s a well performed soft side to him as he opens up about his past.

Perhaps it isn’t a fantastic movie in terms of writing or directing, but I stand by the fact I liked it and what it tried to pull off.

6/10

Bare (2015)

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Almost like a spiritual journey, this film brings together dramatic moments and a sort of coming of age vibe as the main character learns about herself when undergoing new experiences. It’s not exactly the most engaging, entertaining or exciting film but led by an absorbing Dianna Agron it keeps the interest up to an average level.

Supermarket cashier Sarah Barton (Dianna Agron) finds a drifter in the antiques shop owned by her family. Pepper (Paz de la Huerta) has contacts in the local strip joint and it isn’t long until normally innocent Sarah is wrapped up in a world of drugs, stripping and Pepper herself.

Directed and written by Natalia Leite, this film has to be fair, a good structure and follows the struggles of Sarah as well as can be expected. It feels and sounds like a very indie movie, what with Pepper spieling off comparisons to herself being an octopus or the smoky, wafty way we see drug trips or the lesbian affair between the two females. Leite seems to do less well with offering up any riveting insight into the strip club world or the characters around it.

The environment we see comes across in a feeling kind of way, if I can write that making sense!? What I mean is that Reno, Nevada and the Blue Room club possess an atmosphere as if speaking a story to us but sadly the characters don’t hold much gripping investment. There is a spiritual mood to this Tribeca Film Festival premiered film and you vaguely get swept up into a feminine vulnerability and sexual whirl but by the end everything feels a bit dry and forgettable.

It is a good debut for Leite though, showing that she knows how to present the strained longings of a woman trapped in a place, wanting out but not knowing what to expect on that other side. The people, muttering about each other or customers blinkered to the boredom of everyday life speak volumes and Sarah as the hopeful wanderer getting a chance meeting with the experienced and unstable Pepper is a great pairing that at least sets off an initial spark even if it doesn’t light up as bright as it could.

There’s good music to be had, that seems to float in without you knowing, nothing pumps distractingly over the top of scenes, it’s there in a good way just as a meandering background noise that enhances that consistent spiritual quality. At times, it sounds like the angelic tones to be heard in the awesomely sound-tracked ‘Drive’, that characteristic music aiding the story well.

Dianna Agron jumps from the cheerleader steps of ‘Glee’ to this more exposed and much more dynamic role of Sarah. She goes in without any trepidations and bares her art in a performance that’s believable and fragile. You stay with the film because of her journey and the way she makes Sarah come alive, not just because I’m slightly more than in love with her! Paz de la Huerta is just right for the wild one, her crazy look and stumbling words make Pepper a totally believable character even if she doesn’t have much more do than set off Sarah’s new path.

A concoction of sex, identity and progression all tumble together in a pretty neat manner, only let down by a sometimes lack of interest and solid ideas throughout the feature.

5.5/10

Anomalisa (2015)

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Entrancingly sombre and creative; Charlie Kaufman is back but with stop-motion to add to his unique repertoire. It’s a wonderful new layer on top of a beautifully thoughtful story, which even though it isn’t his strongest, it becomes more engaging because of the way everything looks. As if an anomaly itself, this is a movie that deserves the praise and award nominations because it is such a distinct animated sensation.

Self help customer service guru Michael Stone (David Thewlis) is staying over at a Cincinnati hotel for one night before the next day’s book reading. However everyone sounds and appears the same to him, that is until he encounters Lisa (Jennifer Jason Leigh) who he falls for and wants to run away with.

I have been aching to see this film for ages, from the first time I saw the trailer and got captivated by how Kaufman it looked. As an added bonus it was stop-motion which is an art form I love and admire for the patience people have to make it happen. Thankfully I have now seen it and can say it was worth the wait. It’s a surreal watch at times with a squinted comic edge that works so well, as things fail around Michael you can’t help but laugh at the awkwardness or typical human elements of what’s happening.

One of the best qualities of this movie lies with the dialogue, for where the plot doesn’t go places the conversations and detail in Kaufman’s writing is smart and personal. There’s an assured vulnerability to both the main characters as they tangle into each other’s lives over one night. The way they talk to each other is full of insight and you end up looking past the puppetry animation and buy into Michael and Lisa as real and lonely people.

Duke Johnson who co-directed this film must be commended for his astonishing and somewhat eerie puppet designs that fill this feature. It’s even more fascinating to realise that these characters were 3D printed, which does give them this special look, with slitted marks defining their faces and making them identifiable to this film. On top of this, the puppet idea is taken a step further than ‘Team America: World Police’ as we see fellatio and sex happen between stop-motion figures in what could be the funniest yet sweetest scene this year.

Musically, this film is handed a lyrical and soft finesse by Carter Burwell who helps the movie sound effortless and hypnotizing, as if we too get lost among the hotel corridors and taken aback by the similar sounding civilians surrounding Michael. The nightmare sequence is both scored greatly and is a fantastic idea to play around with, though from Kaufman I wished it had have been real, manifesting the story a little more as Michael questions his own identity but that’s not his story! Also Leigh performing two versions of ‘Girls Just Want to Have Fun’ is hilarious but poetic.

I can only say that the big fault for me was the plot, story-wise I was a bit saddened to not have something more unique. The visuals and dialogue were incredible but the narrative was a little ‘Lost in Translation’ and nothing else. It’s only one negative I could find because Kaufman usually comes up with something inventive whereas this was a more conventional love story, at least for Kaufman it’s more normal than you’d expect. That being said, the story of two people lost and finding hope to be short-lived is such a tragic and subtly dark tale which I like a lot.

David Thewlis voices Michael in such a British way, being klutzy yet smart in what he knows and how he approaches the vastly different Lisa. It’s pretty much the perfect voice for this puppet. Jennifer Jason Leigh brings innocent comic timing to her worrisome role as Lisa, which bounces off Michael Stone greatly. She’s shy, naive, goofy and comes alive thanks to Leigh’s magical vocals. Tom Noonan who voices everyone else, male or female brings a great one-tone level to his performance that makes all other characters spookily bland and unremarkable in the eyes of Michael.

It’s a very original animation that is crafted masterfully from the puppetry to the written word. Kaufman strikes again, making love a haunting┬áspecial backdrop to despair into.

8.5/10

 

The Duke of Burgundy (2014)

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Appearing at the Toronto International Film Festival last year before hitting the UK market in 2015, I had heard a lot about this film in the last several months and got myself round to seeing what it’s all about not too long ago. Some had said it’s the better choice to Fifty Shades others commented on it’s unique storytelling, I can see both but also come in feeling a little lost to the weird texture presented.

Evelyn (Chiara D’Anna) is a maid in the home of Cynthia (Sidse Babett Knudsen). If the younger Evelyn doesn’t complete tasks properly or to Cynthia’s satisfaction she is subjected to punishment but through the film we see that this strained relationship isn’t exactly a one way street.

I really like the beginning and the way we come into the environment. The dappled sun, butterflies and bicycles. It feels utterly European and bursting with a warm nature yet it somehow tingles with a mysterious darkness at the same time. I also enjoyed how the pairing changes once we realise the truth of what is going on. The character development and relationship drama is pitched brilliantly and you buy into this odd yet clearly passionate couple.

Peter Strickland writes and directs a genuinely interesting movie that deals with eroticism and behaviour in a detailed and artistic way. The dialogue between the two is fraught when necessary and very believable in the issues they face playing the slave/master routine, E.L James should really take any writing course just so she knows how people speak to each other and what constitutes engaging talk.

Strickland also directs with an eye for not losing any substance, obviously this kind of narrative could have been lost under another director keen to show off the arty farty mode of filmography but he doesn’t, yes there are still weird little moments that make it feel like a foreign feature even though it isn’t, but overall he makes sure the story of love and passion is never lost to the wind.

It has to be said that the music through the film helps a lot in creating that sense of intrigue and realistic relationship ideas. Cat’s Eyes are an alt pop duo and they give this feature a fantastic otherworldly and calm soundtrack. Once again, the opening is such a great introduction to the world because of it’s look and it’s music. There’s also a haunting vibe to the vocals that softly pulls you into this world unlike the often pathetic songs used in ’50 Shades of Grey’ that seemed more about getting big names than thinking how the music could fit the plot.

There’s perhaps too long a focus on the butterfly side of proceedings, their classes are fine but go on too long, the shot of slow motion butterflies against a black screen doesn’t seem to cut away for an eternity providing no real weight or metaphor to the film. I must also say I found the film often lulling in the points I expected to be gripped.

The two females are fantastic and this film stomps all over the Bechdel Test having only women, speaking about subjects aside from men. It’s refreshing to see a movie do it and it shows that a good film without men is possible…shock horror! D’Anna plays the curious Evelyn really well, a tinge of youth and sadness in her eye as she’s the maid but a more assured domineering posture settles as she takes charge and wants more items for the house. Knudsen is the more rewarding of the two to watch I felt, her character becomes great to watch as she struggles to face the relationship she’s becoming a part of.

I would recommend it to certain friends and for people wanting to see something different, it’s not entertaining or wholly stupendous but it’s a gorgeous and well told story about passion.

7/10